A-Level Links

Inequality

 
Sociology Corner   Oxford Mobility Study  
A neat little site, run by Ben Austin, that offers an eclectic range of materials. Of most interest to A-level students will be the class and stratification notes, in addition to a range of notes covering race and ethnic relations. These are basically designed to compliment an American undergraduate course, but they contain some useful information that is roughly similar to A-level standard. You will, of course, also find a range of links to other sociology sites around the world. Admittedly it's not the most exiting topic (or web page come to that), but if you're after information about Goldthorpe's study (and the way we viewed social mobility in the early 1970's) then this is probably as good as it gets...
People Like Us   S.H.I.EL.D  
Although aimed at a GCSE-level audience, this neat site focuses on Social Class in America, using a mixture of text, games and video to get its message across - and the message is that, whatever a skeptical US audience may believe to the contrary, social class is alive, well and causing all kinds of trouble in God's Own Country. The site will not be to everyone's taste, but the child in me thinks it's great...   Part of the SHIELD (Sociologies of Health and Illness ELearning Databank) project charged with producing good quality teaching and learning materials related to the sociology of health and illness, this particular module focuses on social class, using a combination of words, sounds and pictures (you will need the Shockwave Flash player to get the most from the site). The material has interactive elements that help to bring a potentially rather dry subject to life.
Sociology 101   An Overview of Social Inequality  
In basic terms, 50+ PowerPoint slides covering a range of social inequality perspectives (all the usual suspects - Functionalist, Marxism, etc.) and issues (poverty, deviance, income and so forth). If you don't want to use it as a web-based resource you can download the source file for stand-alone use... Mike Kearl's site, although based around social inequality in the USA, contains a range of useful information and links (to both articles and useful web sites). The emphasis here is on exploration rather than the simple presentation of information (although this is what it all eventually comes down to...), so it's probably a site teachers need to map / explore for themselves before letting their students loose on it to surf with varying degrees of aimlessness...
Theories of Class and Stratification      
A large resource for all things unequal with the emphasis, as the title suggests, on theory. It's an undergraduate site so it may need to be given the once-over before you direct your students to it. It does, however, contain (amongst other things) sets of "interactive notes" (that's notes with a few hyperlinks to you and me) that might be usefully edited by teachers to bring them down to A2 level.  
 General Sociology Links

Inequality

 
Gender Inn   4000 Years of Women in Science  
A neatly-presented site which is, in basic terms, a searchable database of records relating to " feminist theory, literary criticism and gender studies focusing on English and American literature". The site claims some 6000+ records and also contains an extensive annotated list of links to gender and women’s studies sites Although this site won't win any prizes for presentation (one section has the nastiest use of Frames I've ever seen), its heart is in the right place (and it does provide non-Frames alternatives). Basically, the site provides information about female achievements in an area where their contribution is often ignored; it offers biographies, photographs, references and links for a range of female scientists, some of whom you may know (Curie, Nightingale), but most you won't (which is, after all, the point).
ActionAid   The Greatest Women in Science History  
This charity (or Non Government Organisation) site provides an international dimension to social inequality. In addition to details about the agency's work you'll find a range of media articles, covering various aspects of developmental inequality, presented in a clear and accessible way. This is a list of links to pages that detail the achievements of a range of female scientists, from the late 18th century to the present.
Centre for Disability Studies   Feminist.com  
If you're looking for up-to-date research material on all aspects of disability studies then this is probably one of - if not the - best places to begin. The Resources section of the site contains an archive of research papers / publications mostly, it has to be said, aimed at an undergraduate level audience. A site that mixes in-house resources with an extensive range of links to all kinds of feminism-related sites. The site itself is fairly basic but, once again, if you've an interest in feminist issues, organisations and resources this is probably a good place to start.
 
Famous Women Throughout History   Women in Science, Engineering and Technology  
A page of annotated links pointing to the contributions made by women to fields such as business, civil rights and intentions. A short article that highlights the existence of female underrepresentation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and suggests some possible explanations for such underrepresentation. The site has an extensive range of links to various aspects of participation - from the relative numbers involved in physics to female involvement in science throughout the ages.